Iroquois Essay

1998 Words8 Pages
Nothing is so fundamental yet so important to the freedoms we enjoy as Americans as the United States Constitution, which guarantees our right to do and say as we please so long as it does no harm. The Iroquois Federation preamble describes the purpose of the government set up by the government in their statements the emphasis is placed on perfect peace for the welfare of the people. Their focus was fighting for, the liberty of the people. Among the Indian nations whose ancient seats were within the limits of our republic, the Iroquois have long continued to occupy the most conspicuous position. The Iroquois flourished in independence, and capable of self protection, long after the new England and Virginia races had surrendered their…show more content…
Every citizen and non-citizens right are guaranteed by the constitution. The constitution can be changed and these changes are called Amendments. The first ten are called the Bill of Rights. There are twenty-six changes to the constitution. By comparing the Iroquois federation to the federalist and anti-federalist positions one will see that there are many similarities as well as the difference among the three. The similarities between the Iroquois an the federalist allows me to believe that the Iroquois were the ones responsible for the shaping this great nation, America. The Adoption of the Constitution      Washington was unanimously chosen president and a secretary was appointed. A few days' later rules of procedure were adopted. It was determined that each state should have one vote in the convention. As was the case in the Virginians, who had arrived in advance of most of the delegations met frequently in informal caucus and drafted series of resolutions, largely the work of Madison, which was presented to the convention on by Governor Randolph.      The Virginian plan, resolutions are called, provided for a division of the central government into three departments, legislative, executive and judicial. The Virginian plan may be called the large state plan. it proposed exchanges in the structure and character of the federal government so sweeping that they could scarcely be regarded merely
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