Is Google Making Us Stupid

1140 Words Feb 12th, 2012 5 Pages
Is Google Making Us Stupid
In the Atlantic Magazine, Nicholas Carr wrote an article, “Is Google Making Us Stupid?” Carr poses a good question about how the internet has affected our brain, by remapping the neural circuitry and reprogramming our memory. Carr states, “My mind isn’t going—so far as I can tell-but it’s changing. I’m not thinking the say way I used to think.”
Carr went on farther, saying that he cannot read as long as he used to, his concentration starts to wonder after two or three pages. He states, “he began to get fidgety and lose his focus and start looking for other things to do.”
Carr says this change is because he spend so much time on the internet, that as a writer, then he finds the Web to be very valuable to him
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Wolf states that, reading on the internet promotes a style that puts “efficiency” and “immediacy” above all else, may be weakening our capacity for the kind of deep reading that emerged when an earlier technology, the printing press, made long and complex works of prose commonplace.
In the New Atlantis, Christine Rosen wrote an article, “People of the Screen.” The article talks about old books that are no longer being printed, that if the books are no longer printed, if we choose to replace the book-what will become of reading and the print culture it fostered? Rosen states, “We have already taken the first steps on our journey to a new form of literacy— “digital literacy.”

Enthusiasts and self-appointed experts assure us that this new digital literacy represents an advance for mankind; the book is evolving, progressing, improving, they argue, and every improvement demands an uneasy period of adjustment.
In the article it states that, “Not everyone endorses this claim for the reading’s value. Bloom, for instance, is not persuaded by claims that reading encourages civic engagement. “You cannot directly improve anyone else’s life by reading better or more deeply,” he argues. No one can deny that our new communications technologies have irrevocably altered the reading