Is It A Human Incubator For Viruses?

968 WordsFeb 14, 20164 Pages
When I was a child, my mother said, “If you don’t cry during your vaccinations, then I will give you a toy paper doll.” Thus, I did not cry at all when I got my shots done. I got what I wanted in addition to not becoming a human incubator for viruses when I got to school. These vaccinations were a requirement before a child could go to school to prevent any spread of illness. Practices like this and many other things in health gives the world less of a chance for a worldwide epidemic with equal or more severity of the Black Death to happen. The available access to medical assistance and hygiene, advancement in medicine, and all the information help with preventing that from occurring. The world in the 1300s did not have these type of luxuries like the 21st century had to offer. This made the spread of viruses easier. Starting with the Middle Ages, access to medical help was limited. The clergy and some of the wealthy were only ones permitted to practice medicine at the time. As a result, most hospitals became extensions to monasteries that were located in cities. If people from the countryside needed medical help, they would have to travel to the city or receive no help at all. Sadly, access to personal hygiene during this time was not any easier. “…the generally low level of personal hygiene especially when compared to modern standards, can be attributed more to the limited facilities available for washing and the attendant inconvenience of using them”(Newman). For
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