Essay about Isolation and Nature in the Works of Robert Frost

3175 Words 13 Pages
Isolation and Nature in the Works of Robert Frost

During the height of Robert Frost’s popularity, he was a well-loved poet who’s natural- and simple-seeming verse drew people - academics, artists, ordinary people both male and female - together into lecture halls and at poetry readings across the country.1 An eloquent, witty, and, above all else, honest public speaker, Frost’s readings imbued his poetry with a charismatic resonance beyond that of the words on paper, and it is of little surprise that people gathered to listen. Yet it remains somewhat ironic that his poetry would possess this power to bring individuals together - poetry that, for the most part, contains a prevailing theme of alienation, of a sense of separation
…show more content…
It is often in this separation that the subject turns to the non-human for solace - and that the relations between the human and the non-human are explored.

Appropriately enough, both these elements - one’s interaction with both the human and the non-human - are contained within the opening poem of North of Boston, The Pasture. We have the narrator heading out ‘. . . to clean the pasture spring’, that is, to participate with nature. There is a clear fondness for the outside extolled within the verse, as shown by the attention to the young calf, and by the desire to remain and ‘watch the water clear’3 - a desire quite contrary to the narratorr’s insistence that ‘I shan’t be gone long.’. What is curious, though, is the request that ends each stanza: ‘ - You come too.’. What needs to be determined is wether this is a genuine request for human accompaniment, or, like the somewhat forced statement it is linked with, a by-rote expression that belies the narrator’s desire to enjoy the idyllic scene alone.

The poem serves well as the opening for the book, encapsulating two of the major themes that North of Boston deals with. However, to examine the first of the scenarios outlined above - poetry in which no human presence is
Open Document