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Ivan Pavlov Research Paper

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Ivan Pavlov was a physiologist, who contributed to the field of medicine, with his study of the physiology of digestion. He was born September 14th, 1849, in Ryazan, Russia, in the village where his father was a priest. When he was young poverty was an issue and everyone assumed he would follow in his father's footsteps and become a priest. However, he was greatly influenced by the most prominent physiologist at the time, Darwin's and his theory of evolution, D. I. Pisarev and I. M. Sechenov the father of physiology; who were spreading around their ideas. Pavlov’s appeal to these new ideas caused him to leave his religious practices and give himself away to science. He began his studies on chemistry and physiology, at the University of St.…show more content…
Petersburg, in Russia when he received his Nobel prize. His experiment helped understand the way humans react to certain objects, or events; just like the dogs. This was cooperative because now we can treat phobias, such as heights, crowding, and even spiders. Just like dogs, humans can be trained to associate things like fears, anxiety and material objects to relaxation, or another emotion and reaction. During this time the political climate was just starting to kick off. Both white and black male could vote causing an agitation in the polls, however this did not seem to affect positively or negatively Pavlov's research. All of his research was summed up and put in an outstanding book named Conditioned. Although Ivan Pavlov did not have a nickname some people refer his experiment as “Ivan’s dogs.” Pavlov’s advancement in physiology were breakthroughs in science, towards the understanding of the digestive system. Although he died the 7th of February in 1936, at Leningrad, Russia, his research was later expanded by other scientist and evolved to a full understanding of our digestive system. So next time you are sitting in the car and listening to music, the explanation to why you react a certain way is tanks to Ivan Pavlov’s
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