Japan American Case International Business Negotiations Joint Venture

7510 WordsNov 22, 200831 Pages
[pic] TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Introduction. 2 2. Negotiations with Japanese and Americans. 2 2.1 The impact of culture on negotiations 2 2.1.1 The Japanese Culture………………………………………….....………………..2 2.1.2 The American Culture………………………………………………………………3 2.2 Differences in negotiation styles between Japan and the US…………………………5 2.3 The profile of a Japanese and an American negotiatior 6 3. The case of Motorola and Toshiba 9 3.1 Introduction to Joint Ventures 9 3.2 General facts about Toshiba, Motorola and TSC 10 3.3 Objectives and agreements 10 3.4 Factors of success 11 3.5 Lessons drawn from the case 12 4. Our intercultural team work 13 4.1 Our team work process 15 4.2 Presentation…show more content…
Individualism in the American society means first and foremost self-determination and self-actualization. Another element of the American culture is the egalitarianism. The high regard of equality can be seen in the pursuit of equal opportunities, in the refusal of authority and paternalism, the requirement of participation as well as in the preference of informal behavior. (Stahl/Langeloh/Kühlmann, 1999: 57) The law for the protection of minorities, against discrimination and the debate of political correctness are also highly developed in The United States. Those values of equal opportunities and freedom are anchored in the Declaration of independence (4 July 1776): “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, and that they are endowed by their creator with certain inalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” The action orientation and the focus on results is another key element of the American culture. (Stahl/Langeloh/Kühlmann, 1999: 85) Americans are pragmatic, looking for a solution that works, while not looking for every solution possible and thinking about their pros and cons but rather by simplifying complex problems and looking for instant solutions. This way of problem solving is linear and acquires less time. (Stahl/Langeloh/Kühlmann, 1999: 90) According to the motto:
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