Japanese Americans In Internment Camps

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On February 19th, 1942 President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066. What this order did was authorize the war department to designate military areas and exclude anyone from them who they felt was a danger or a threat. Its specific target without being obvious was Japanese Americans. This was just a little over 2 months after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Over 110,000 Japanese Americans living along the West Coast would soon be ordered to enter Internment Camps. The government had also ordered Italian and German immigrants living in the United States to be sent to the camps as well. According to PBS there was a plan drawn up in Washington to include all 158,000 Japanese people living in Hawaii to be sent to the camps as well. Wealthy land…show more content…
Military area 1 included toe southern half of Arizona and the Western half of California, Oregon, and Washington. It also included all of California that was South of Los Angeles. Area 2 covered the rest of the remaining areas of those states. It was then made that the Japanese Americans would be required to leave area 1, but they could stay in area 2. This policy only lasted for a short time before there was another proclamation issued by De Witt that prohibited the Japanese Americans from leaving Area 1. A night curfew was also put into place on March 27th, 1942. This was to put further limitations on the movement and daily living of the Japanese…show more content…
According to Johan Galtung, structural violence is defined as “a form of violence wherein some social structure or social institution may harm people by preventing them from meeting their basic needs.” The American government forced hundreds of thousands of Japanese Americans into internment camps just because of their ethnicity. It did not matter if you were born here or not. If you were Japanese, you were trouble and were thrown into a work camp. Because of the fear instilled into the American people after the attacks on Pearl Harbor, everyone turned against the Japanese. 2/3 of the camp workers were American born. Before being sent away to the camps, the workers were kept in stockyards, fairgrounds, and race tracks. At the camps there was no heat and food was rationed. Workers had to pay .48 to eat per meal per day. These people’s basic human rights were taken from them and they were treated unfairly. The reconciliation was when the camps were closed in January of 1945. The government ended up paying the people who were in the camps a total of $37,000,000 total and an additional $20,000 to each individual that was still alive in 1988 due to a persuasion from the Japanese
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