Jetblue Crisis Feb 2007- Synopsis

1774 Words Feb 11th, 2011 8 Pages
Name: XX
School of Management MCNY
Professor Noreen Kentish
Management Information Systems
Assignment 2- JetBlue Turbulence Individual Case Study/Synopsis
Date: 1/31/11

JetBlue Airways was created with the primary purpose to provide low cost American flights with “top-notch customer service” at budget prices. On the stormy day of February 14, 2007, their airline service was tested to the extreme. JetBlue initially serviced passengers between New York and Florida and then expanded rapidly. By the end of 2006, the airline had 500 flights operating in 50 different cities providing each passenger with (luxury) amenities such as TV, and leather seats (Laudon, pg. 72). This rapid expansion brought challenges the airline had not prepared
…show more content…
Due to so many passengers rebooking or tracking their (lost) baggage, the airlines automated system and skeletal staff could not handle all the traffic and crashed. Furthermore, the airline did not have a system in place to effectively communicate with its employees in case of such emergencies. “With the breakdown in communications, thousands of pilots and flight attendants were out of position, and the staff could neither find them nor tell them where to go” (Laudon, 2010, p.73). Overall, the airline’s primary problems is best outlined by their Chief Executive, David Neeleman, who admits in an interview that “JetBlue management was not strong enough and its communication system was inadequate (Laudon, 2010, p.73). The department responsible for allocating pilots and crews to flights was too small” (Laudon, 2010, p.73). This was a wake up call for the company that had relied on low cost technology, and a skeleton workforce.
Notwithstanding the mishap, JetBlue remained true to its business model of excellent customer service. JetBlue took a very active role after the crisis. David G Neeleman, the airline’s CEO, was openly apologetic to JetBlue’s customers and took accountability for the situation. He promptly expressed deep regret that good intentions, the plan to fully cater to customers needs, had gone wrong. Learning from the meltdown, JetBlue management introduced numerous changes to deal with inadequate staffing,