Jews Without Money

2111 Words9 Pages
Jews Without Money Jews Without Money is based on its author’s own childhood, Michael Gold. It re-creates the Jewish immigrant Lower East Side in Manhattan in which he lived, and it provides insight into the life of first- and second-generation Jewish Americans around the turn of the twentieth century. Gold does a wonderful job at putting the reader right in the middle of the sights, smells and sounds of people who may be materially poor, but very rich emotionally. The book paints for the most part a bleak picture of Jewish immigrant life in America, a picture that will remain bleak, the book’s ending implies, until the workers’ revolution occurs. In this paper I will discuss few issues that come up in the book and in the documents that…show more content…
Article VI states…freedom of religion as a basic law of the land. It goes on to say no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the United States (p.457). In the book we do see religious freedom however we do see discrimination of it because it is a different religion then the majority. This is truly unfair and the author makes it clear. If the law states and accepts religious freedom why is it so hard to accept others differences and for them to come up in the society? They struggled a lot but in the end they over came the obstacle course. With the law on their back, they are able to practice their religious views and make a difference in America. This story really makes you appreciate the issues that these poor Jewish immigrants faced and confirms that the American Dream certainly is possible as we have the luxury today in 2010 to evaluate the situations of many of these character 's descendants. These people worked hard and helped each other and therefore made better lives for their future generations. The most admirable character in the book is Katie. She shows kindness to all, even the prostitutes who live near their apartment. When she works in the cafeteria, the other workers come to her with their problems. She remains gentle and concerned with doing the right thing, even though life for her is a constant round of work. The one time Mike sees her truly happy is when the family goes to Bronx
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