John Cheever's The Swimmer, O Youth and Beauty!, and The Enormous Radio

1563 WordsJul 12, 20187 Pages
Throughout history, America has produced some of the greatest writers to walk the earth. Novels, poems, plays, and short stories have captivated the American public. No one was better at enchanting his audience than John Cheever. John Cheever wrote many short stories throughout his life. He has been presented with many awards for his works. Cheever was a master of spinning tales about suburban life and other situations he experienced. Some of his most popuar works included “The Swimmer”, “O Youth and Beauty!”, and “The Enormous Radio”. His works were well received by the public and he achieved great fame during his lifetime. However, he also lived a life of hardship and scandal. Even after his death in 1982, Cheever is remembered as one…show more content…
John Cheever wrote many great short stories that embodied the strange nature of people and entertained audiences with dramatic twists. Some of Cheever’s greatest works included “The Swimmer”, “O Youth and Beauty!”, and “The Enormous Radio”. These stories were received with mixed praise and criticism. Generally, Cheever’s works were looked upon as great pieces of literature. However, it is also known that he has many failures throughout his career that were met with vicious condemnation. Among these were his novel Bullet Park and his short story “Boy in Rome”. Towards the end of “Boy in Rome”, Cheever interrupts the story and says that “But I am not a boy in Rome” and alludes to himself. Critics who have read much of Cheever’s work recognize this recurring trait in his writing. They claimed that Cheever was too impatient with plot and too often injected himself into the stories. This is why he was not overly accomplished as a novelist but very accomplished as a short story writer (Collins). “The Swimmer” was featured in several of John Cheever’s collections of short stories. It tells the tale of Neddy Merrill’s frivolous attempt to return home from his friend’s house by swimming through every pool in the county. Neddy’s neighbors greet him warmly at first, but eventually begin to treat him coldly or apologize for his “misfortunes”. As the journey continues, he feels tired and people treat him even more harshly. When

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