Judge Harlan 's Dissent : The Plessy Vs Plessy Case

1921 WordsOct 4, 20178 Pages
Part One Judge Harlan’s Dissent is a written response about the Plessy vs. Ferguson decision. In the Plessy vs. Ferguson case, Homer Plessy argued that his decision to break the Louisiana Separate Car Act was denying his rights in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Amendments, but the majority decision debunked his arguments. However, Judge Harlan’s Dissent explains his reasoning for disagreeing with the majority. His opinions were likely intended to be heard by all citizens of the United States, but it seems as though he is aiming the disagreement at the people in the majority who is against it in order to prove his point. First, Judge Harlan points out that Plessy is right that the Constitution defends his rights to sit in a car with a…show more content…
Ferguson case prove otherwise. Harlan concludes that these are several of the reasons he does not agree with the court decision. Overall, Harlan stays clear of biases because he includes information about rights for both races and does not defend one single side. However, there are potential biases because he did not directly include the court decision or Louisiana Separate Car Act in his dissent. It is also is unclear what Judge Harlan’s background is and what his opinions could have been before the specific case. In this document, it is obvious that the time period was facing a time of segregation in the country. The Louisiana Separate Car Act that is part of the Plessy vs. Ferguson case shows the physical separation between the races. During this time period, it was typical for whites and non-whites to have separate public resources because the Redeemers hoped to undo the Radical Reconstruction progress in African American and non-white rights. In addition, non-whites were disrespected and dehumanized, as shown by Harlan’s mention of the Louisiana Separate Car Act dismissal of the fact that whites could not sit with a non-white group of people. Part Two After the Civil War, the United States entered a period of reinventing America in order to restore the damage of the

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