Justin Martyr Essay

942 Words Feb 18th, 2008 4 Pages
Justin martyr.

Summarise your Knowledge and understanding of the life and work of Justin Martyr

Justin Martyr was the greatest apology in the second century from Palestine, he spent a lot of his time searching for the truth, and this is why he passed through many philosophical schools.

Justin finally came to rest when he thought he had found the truth with Plato's religion, this was because of its mystical side.

Justin then met an old man on the sea shore who told him about the prophets of the Old Testament which foretold the coming of Christ; this made the religion have antiquity with its ancient roots. Justin converted and he had to abandon his philosophical inquires and all he had learnt in Platonism, Justin regarded
…show more content…
Justin repudiates the charges of cannibalism and incest.

Justin in the 1st apology also attacks the pagan charge of atheism; he also states that Christians are atheists when it comes to worshiping pagan Gods. "But not with respect to the most true God"

Chapters 61-67 contain lots of information on baptism and Eucharist. Justin went into the detail of what happens at these meetings, this was to show people that Christians were innocent people. "this is how we celebrate our worship." Justin gives us an explanation of the meaning Eucharist and a clear account of why it's celebrated.

Justin then wrote a second apology, which was a lot shorter consisting of 15 chapters. It is sometimes known to be a follow up of the first apology. It contains a passionate protest against the unjust execution of Ptolemy by Urbicus who was innocent of crime. "Why have you punished this man?" "Who has only confessed that he is called by the name of a Christian?"

Justin's second apology calls for the emperor to publish the first apology and to command that justice be observed in dealings with the Christians.

The dialogue of the Trypho is a summary of a disputation held at Ephesus between Justin and the Jew Trypho which is spread over two days.