Juvenile Delinquency

3863 WordsDec 23, 201216 Pages
Juvenile delinquency Juvenile delinquency, also known as juvenile offending, or youth crime, is participation in illegal behavior by minors (juveniles) (individuals younger than the statutory age of majority).Most legal systems prescribe specific procedures for dealing with juveniles, such as juvenile detention centers, and courts. A juvenile delinquent is a person who is typically under the age of 18 and commits an act that otherwise would have been charged as a crime if they were an adult. Depending on the type and severity of the offense committed, it is possible for persons under 18 to be charged and tried as adults. In recent years, the average age for first arrest has dropped significantly, and younger boys and girls are committing…show more content…
Ethnic minority status (that is, experience as non- White) has been included as a risk factor of psychosocial maladaptation in several studies (e.g., Gutman et al. 2003; Sameroff et al. 1993; Dallaire et al. 2008), and represents a relative social disadvantage placed on these individuals. Though the relation between delinquency and race is complex and may be explained by other contextual risk variables (see, for example, Holmes et al. 2009), the total arrest rate for black juveniles aged 10–17 is more than twice that as of white juveniles (National Center for Juvenile Justice 2008)(p. 1474). • Risk factors The two largest predictors of juvenile delinquency are parenting style, with the two styles most likely to predict delinquency being "permissive" parenting, characterized by a lack of consequence-based discipline and encompassing two subtypes known as "neglectful" parenting, characterized by a lack of monitoring and thus of knowledge of the child's activities, and "indulgent" parenting, characterized by affirmative enablement of misbehavior), and "authoritarian" parenting, characterized by harsh discipline and refusal to justify discipline on any basis other than "because I said so"; and peer group association, particularly with antisocial peer groups, as is more likely when adolescents are left unsupervised. Other factors that may lead a teenager into juvenile delinquency include, poor or

More about Juvenile Delinquency

Open Document