Karl Marx Division Of Labor

1573 Words7 Pages
the various accounts of this phenomenon? What role does the division of labor play in contemporary society according to the authors? What is the assumed connection, if any, of the division of labor to other concepts that can be used to describe the economy (as for instance capitalism) or to other spheres of social life, such as politics? What role does the division of labor play in producing and/or sustaining economic and other forms of inequality?” Division of labor is a central theme among classical sociologists such as Adam Smith, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, and Emile Durkheim. These theorists, although being alive during different points in history, provide similar understandings of what division of labor is and its consequences.…show more content…
Marx explains his views in The German Ideology as he states, “For as soon as division of labor comes into being, each man has a particular, exclusive sphere of activity, which is forced upon him and from which he cannot escape” (Marx: GI, 159) Here Marx is specifically describing how division of labor causes alienation among the worker and makes them estranged to the work that they are producing and society as whole. According to Marx, the worker suffers four types of alienation: alienation of the worker from other workers, from their product, from the overall production, and alienation of the worker from himself. (Marx; EL, 74 ). Alienation creates an inequality for the workers as humans we live in order of making work that pertains a value to the individual. Marx believes that labor is essential to human beings self-conception, labor is a form recreational growth however, through division of labor man becomes alienated from the experience of producing something personal that attains value to them and not just the…show more content…
Even though division of labor causes rapid changes leaving no common ground for huge societies to connect on, Durkheim argues that this environment motivates social actions targeted towards the good of man’s own kind for “nothing remains which men can love and honor in common if not man-himself” (Durkheim: II, 53). Organic solidarity creates between men “a whole system of rights which bind them together in an enduring way,” promoting for actions that focus on bettering humankind (Durkheim: DL, 47). Thus, even though the individual becomes more autonomous through division of labor, they are still interdependent with one
Get Access