Key issues teachers need to consider when teaching Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

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What are some of the key issues teachers need to consider for working successfully with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students? Introduction Teaching Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students requires a number of strategies and ideas which the teacher needs to keep in mind at all times. Teaching Aboriginal students requires sensitivity for their needs and knowledge about Aboriginal cultural conventions. An example of being wary of their needs is understanding the lack of eye contact an Aboriginal student makes with a non-Indigenous teacher. For example, Aboriginal students can avoid direct eye contact to an adult as it is considered rude in Aboriginal culture. However, the opposite (avoiding eye contact) is considered rude…show more content…
This proves that understanding racial identity is a worldwide issue. ‘In Australia, however, we don’t know the impact of racism, especially of subtle and prolonged forms of racism, on the mental wellbeing of Aboriginal children and how this impacts on their academic self-concept and consequently academic achievement and outcomes (Purdie, Milgate & Bell, 2011). The important relationship between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and their teachers The important relationship building teachers must conduct with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students is another key issue teachers must keep in mind for working successfully with Indigenous students. Price (2012) argues that teachers hold a special place in the Indigenous community, especially with parents and caregivers. She states that by “mastering the craft” of teaching, you will be rewarded both personally and professionally over the years of your career (Price, 2012). Over the last 30 years, a number of prepositions have been put forward that will assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students to become emotionally healthy, so they can live out their entitlement to becoming a dignified citizen of Australia and the world (Price, 2012). That being said, the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australian’s literacy and numeracy achievements is still so
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