Labor And Giving Birth Outside Of The Hospital Essay

1203 WordsOct 20, 20165 Pages
Precipitous Labor and Giving Birth Outside of the Hospital: Nurses Role Precipitous labor, according to Suzuki (2015), can be defined as birth lasting less than three hours after the start of contractions. Wilbeck and Schorn (2013) found “In 2008 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention documented 4,247,694 live births in the United States.1 Of those births, 96,180 were reported as precipitous in nature” (p. 4). Precipitous births can be problematic for mother and baby as well as the staff providing the care. In my interview, the mother’s birth was occurring so fast she did not have time to make it to the hospital and gave birth in the ambulance. Precipitous labor is found to occur more often in multiparous women. Their body may be stretched and used to the process of labor allowing it to occur more quickly. Precipitous labor may also occur because of hypertension; drug use, which can lead to stronger contractions; and having a precipitous labor with an earlier child (Wilbeck & Schorn). This process can be scary, especially if you have come up with a birth plan and are unable to follow that. Some women have doulas, or midwives they want present at their birth for additional support, like the mother I interviewed; however, because their birth occurs so quickly and can be unpredictable they lose that extra feeling of support. As nurses we vow to encourage, teach, and support our patients throughout the lifespan. Precipitous labor is a topic that not only
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