Lady Macbeth: a Wife in Support of Her Husband

1228 Words Oct 3rd, 1999 5 Pages
Lady Macbeth: A Wife in Support of Her Husband

One of the main characters in Macbeth, Lady Macbeth, has been an object of intense criticism. Although sometimes regarded as cruel and vile, evidence exists that Shakespeare did not intend for her to be judged so harshly. By evaluating her character in relation to her actions, her overall relationship with Macbeth, and her death, we can see that Shakespeare quite possibly wanted
Lady Macbeth to be judged in association with the actions of Macbeth. What appears to others as ruthlessness and ambition, is really her loyalty and love for him. Just as Macbeth is ambitious for the throne, so is Lady Macbeth driven to assist him. All of her actions are done out of devotion and allegiance to
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She says to them, "My lord is often thus,/ And hath been from his youth. Pray you, keep seat./ The fit is momentary;" (III.iv.53-55). She hides her husband 's insanity, and later commands the lords at the dinner to leave, stating, "Stand not upon the order of your going,/ But go at once" (III.iv.118-119). In this time when
Macbeth could have revealed his associations with the previous murders, Lady
Macbeth defended and stood up for him. The relationship between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth exists through their desirous schemes. There are never any intimate moments between them, so one must observe their relationship through their actions and their words to one another.
While alone in the palace after the murder of Banquo had been planned, Macbeth talks of their past actions in remorse, but Lady Macbeth is there to help build his self esteem. She says, "Why do you keep alone, … Things without all remedy/
Should be without regard: what 's done is done" (III.ii.11-12). She continues to comfort him by further saying, "Gentle my lord, sleek o 'er your rugged looks;/
Be bright and jovial" (III.ii.27-28). She is concerned with his declining mental state and continually tries to aid him through her support. The death of Lady Macbeth is vital in understanding her mental condition.
At the beginning of the play she appears to be unyielding and insensitive to all feelings, but as the play progresses her conscience
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