Language And Language Acquisition Of Language By Edward Sapir

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3. Language Acquisition and Socialization Language is a great force of socialization, probably the greatest that exists. Edward Sapir (1949[1933]:15) At the beginning of this part the author has used an example of an infant in order to claim that linguistic anthropologists have shown that this way of using language with infants is “characteristic neither of all societies nor of all social groups. Through a couple of examples she claims that caregivers socialize their children to become very different types of social beings through culturally specific uses of language. She wants to deal with questions about the process of language acquisition and socialization. In each of these areas, linguistic anthropology has a unique location view the offer…show more content…
The author attempts to show the diversity of cultures in the way parents interact with their young children as they learn to speak. Studies by the researchers indicate that cultural values, language ideologies and social practices of a particular community can influence important aspects of the acquisition process of the language, such as the order in which certain grammatical structures learned or even if a particular language is acquired at all. Another interesting point is highlighted that the acquisition of language does not end with childhood, but continues taking new roles in life or learning a second…show more content…
Some linguistic anthropologists believe that Whorf’s premise shapes culture and thoughts more significantly than the way people realize. “The particular language you speak might predispose you to view the world a certain way, but it will not prevent you from challenging that view” (Ahearn 2012:66). Based on the hypothesis of Sapir-Whorf language has the capacity to shape our thought and way of living, however they had different consideration this role of language is completely seen. A Hundred Years of Linguistic Relativity Some researchers have been arguing that people in some societies were incapable of complex, abstract "scientific" thought because of the apparent lack of "logical" grammar categories in their languages. Boas (1858–1942) maintained that the language spoken by a particular group of people only tended to reflect their traditional cultural practices. He declared that Language may facilitate certain types of thought and could provide a valuable means of understanding the unconscious patterns culture and thought but it would not prevent people to think in a way that differs from the presented categories more conveniently in their
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