Language Follows Evolution of Jackson and Trewe Relationship Paralleling the Colonization to Post-Colonial Movement in Pantomime

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Language Follows Evolution of Jackson and Trewe Relationship Paralleling the Colonization to Post-Colonial Movement in Pantomime The play opens on the edge of a cliff; anything can happen. Derek Walcott, a playwright from the Caribbean, lives his own life on the edge of a cliff. Walcott’s family placed strong emphasis on education and ancestry. His inherent duality, European and African, mirrors that of post-colonialism (Gilbert 131). It is this duality that Walcott tries to reconcile in his work, drawing on his experiences in the theatre and in the Caribbean (King 260). In Pantomime, Walcott employs the versatility of language to describe the evolving relationship between main characters Harry Trewe and Jackson Philip paralleling the…show more content…
Helen Gilbert and Joanne Tompkins assert that Walcott “resituates Robinson Crusoe in a new temporal setting but maintains its original geographic locale” in order to allude “to the ways in which the Crusoe story has perpetuated an exoticised vision of the Caribbean that still circulates in western discourses” (36). Walcott provides a stark contrast in showing a decaying hotel amidst a paradise showing that even paradise has serious and valid problems. The decay in the hotel also represents a turning point. The hotel can fall into complete disrepair or can be salvage and patched up. Like the hotel, the characters’ relationship is at a turning point and can also fall into disrepair or can be salvaged. Harry is full of inner turmoil and Jackson is upset by the role he plays at work. Unknowingly, the characters will embark on a dialogue that leads to new understandings. The characters, Harry Trewe and Jackson Phillip, immediately show the sharply contrasting diversity of the island. Harry Trewe is English, in his mid-forties, a retired actor and war-veteran. Jackson Phillip is Trinidadian, forty, and a retired calypsonian who played in a steel-band. Both are retired performers, and close to the same age, but the men come from different cultures, naturally instilled with different values that initially clash, but somewhere can be reconciled. The critic Thieme agrees and in his own words suggests

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