Language, Power, And The Classroom Analysis

729 Words3 Pages
While reading chapter six from Beyond Grammar Language, Power, and the Classroom, written by Mary R. Harmon and Marilyn J. Wilson, I began to realize how much we become caught up in the rules of the so-called Standard American English. It is sad because people are being judged on their dialect, which is a representation of who people are and where they are from. I have found myself correcting people that have a different dialect, or correcting people that say words that I have been told were not proper language, such as the word ain’t. Standard American English is something that is embedded in our brains at a young age and as we go through school; language is something teachers are constantly correcting children on. Reading about dialect has…show more content…
I had a hard time pronouncing words that contained the letter r; therefore, I had to attend speech class twice a week. Going to a speech class helped me correct my language, but lowered my self-confidence. I was that student that did not want to read or speak in front of the class because my language was constantly being corrected. I still sometimes feel very uncomfortable speaking in front of people. Therefore, I have to remind myself that confidence is the key to success. I realize from my experience when I was a child, that if teachers or adults over correct children, especially when it comes to language differences, children are more apt to be silent and not talk. Children tend to lack social needs and self-confidence because they are told their language is bad or not right according to the American Standard…show more content…
Therefore, I love that Harmon and Wilson states that “No dialect limits its speakers’ ability to express complex thoughts, to think critically, or to use a full range of linguistic functions and purpose” (154-55). As a society and as future teachers, we need to teach our students that people have different dialects, and the differences do not make anyone less smart, or less of a person just like Harmon and Wilson explain that, “Dialects are different not deficient systems” (155). Everyone wants to be treated equal and have equal opportunities; therefore, everyone needs to be more open minded and realize that everyone has their own dialect, which does not make them any less of an intellectual person than anyone else. Reading chapter six from Beyond Grammar Language, Power, and the Classroom, written by Mary R. Harmon and Marilyn J. Wilson has open my eyes not to base peoples’ language off from standard American English because everyone has a different dialect depending on their culture. I am going to be more mindful of peoples’ dialect, and not be quick to judge a person based on their language because a person's language is what makes that individual unique. Instead, I am going to embrace the different dialects and use them as an advantage when teaching a classroom
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