Law 421

990 WordsNov 17, 20124 Pages
| Tort Actions | Week 3 Law 421 | | David Tiffany UOP | Shalandrea Jones | October 29, 2012 | Torts are civil laws that are broken and are rules for lawsuits. When these rules are broken they can result in injury and harm this is usually the basis for the claim. Torts are punishable by imprisonment but in most cases tort law is to provide relief for damages and to stop others from doing the same thing. The injured party can sue for loss of earnings, pain and suffering, and medical expenses or present and future. Torts can fall under 3 categories intentional torts, negligent torts, and strict liability. Intentional torts include intentionally…show more content…
Almost every jurisdiction a person is responsible for all losses and damages that result from his or her negligence. With certain exceptions owners, people who handles pets, and people that harbor pets can be held responsible for injuries caused by their pet. Negligence is also defined as the lack or ordinary care. An example of an unreasonable action would be a dog owner letting go of his dogs leash when another dog approaches so that the dogs can play. An unreasonable action might be the failure to keep a dog away from guest when it is prone to play rough or knock people down. Negligence is also considered when an adult places a watchdog in the room with a sleeping infant. If a person fails to protect a visitor from a potentially dangerous pet this falls under the doctrine of premises liability. Landlords, landowners and management companies can be held liable and responsible to their tenants failing to get rid of a vicious animal. The final example with the ferret this is an example of negligence. Any animal has the potential to be vicious if it exposed to new people or feels threatened. So if the homeowners have company it is best to keep the ferret in a cage or in a room with the door closed to avoid possible injuries to their guest. If the pet owner follows all necessary precautions an incident occurs then they will not be liable for the incident if one occurs. References www.lawcornell.edu www.lawexpert.com

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