Essay on Leadership and Lopez

1830 Words Oct 10th, 2012 8 Pages
Table of Contents
Problem Identification…………………………………………………………………………...3

Situation Analysis………………………………………………………………………………..4

Recommendations………………………………………………………………………………..6

References………………………………………………………………………………………..8

Problem Identification
Analyzing the case study mGames prepared by Scott Hill (2002), several problems were identified as contributors to the issues the organization is going through. These consist of poor listening skills between the different levels of employees, lack of communication during important decision making endeavors, and ineffective group relationships.
The differences in management’s personalities and leadership styles contribute to their poor listening
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111). However, Hill (2002) comments that most of the mGames staff felt that Lopez’s appointment to the role of vice-president was a good move, as many viewed him as someone with “experience and credibility” (p. 10). This would indicate that he gained what Engleberg and Wynn describe as “personal power” from the very beginning. By the time Lopez was appointed to the position of president and CEO of mGames, Lopez’s leadership personal power over subordinates only increased based on his expertise, persuasion, charisma, and experience that he gained throughout his tenure (Engleberg & Wynn, 2010, p.110).
Lopez found this new opportunity to be quite “intriguing” since the company would provide him “more autonomy” and the ability to “have a bigger impact” (Hill, 2002, p. 10). Apparently, Marks had full faith in Lopez’s ability to solve problems. In fact, during the conversation where Marks informed Lopez of the impending takeover attempt, Marks said, “we’ve got to do something.” However, he then tells Lopez to come up with a plan. There appeared to be no use of the problem solving model negotiations model, which Thompson (2009) defines as “two people [sitting] on the same side of the table and [attempting] to solve a puzzle together” (p.189).
The internal conflict and bickering between the sales staff and software developers stems from each department’s perception of the other department’s expertise. According to Rothwell (2004), for a group to effectively exhibit