Legend Day Character Analysis

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In Legend, the main character Day, quite similarly carries the same characteristic as Boxer does, mentioned before. In Legend, Day is known as a “criminal,” to the Republic but when being a reader of the book you can easily see the sympathetic, kind person he is, much like Boxer. In the novel, Day risks being caught, tortured and killed to go back to his family house and spy on his family and make sure they’re doing okay and they have what they need to get by, we also see this very early in the book to give you an image of who Day actually is and what he is willing to risk for loved ones: “I [Day] shake my head. ‘One night a week, remember? Just let me check up on them [family] one night a week.’ ‘Yeah, you’ve been coming here every night this…show more content…
It shows Day’s sympathy he has towards his family. Another example of Day’s sympathetic personality is the story of how him and Tess became close friends, Day explains how he met her and she was a scared fragile little girl and he took her in and helped her; “‘Can I help you [Tess] get home?’ ‘I don’t have a home.’ ‘You don’t? Where are your parents?’ She shook her head again. I [Day] sighed and dropped my canvas bag to the ground, then held out a hand to…show more content…
He sticks with something he starts, and sticks with what he believes in. Boxer kept all the animals working on the windmill, motivated them and ended up becoming the main builder of the windmill. Boxer was brainwashed into believing this windmill would be revolutionary and help the farm immensely so he ended up dedicating most of his time and himself towards the building of the windmill: “Nothing could have been achieved without Boxer, whose strength seemed equal to that of all the rest of the animals put together. When the boulder began to slip and the animals cried out in despair at finding themselves dragged down the hill, it was always Boxer who strained himself against the rope and brought the boulder to a stop. To see him toiling up the slope inch by inch, his breath coming fast, the tips of his hoofs clawing at the ground and his great sides matted with sweat filled everyone with admiration. Clover warned him sometimes to be careful not to overstrain himself, but Boxer would never listen to her. His two slogans ‘Napoleon is always right’, seemed to have a sufficient answer to all his problems. He had made arrangements with the cockerel to call him three-quarters of an hour earlier in the mornings instead of half an hour. And in his spare moments, of which there were not many nowadays, he would go alone to the quarry, collect a load of broken stone and drag it down to the site of the windmill unassisted.”
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