Life in Japanese Internment Camp

4453 Words18 Pages
The Unimaginable: The life in Japanese Americans Internment Camps

By

OUTLINE
Introduction
Thesis: Even though the Japanese Americans were able to adapt to their new environment, the
Japanese American internment camps robbed the evacuees of their basic rights.
Background
I. Japanese Americans adapted to their new environment by forming communities at the camps. A. One of the first actions that evacuees took is establishing school system.
B. The evacuees established self-government among themselves.
C. The evacuees produced own food and other products for themselves.
II. The evacuees adapted to their new environment by creating means of joy and happiness. A. The internees played games and sports. B. The
…show more content…
Japanese Americans had to leave the zone by direct and indirect force, and the government passed the law which gave the military authority to move Nisei and Issei (34). Along with that, the Executive Order 9012, passed in March, created the War Relocation Authority (WRA) (35). The WRA’s job was to take charge of the internees after they were moved to the camps (35). The Japanese American Citizen League (JACL) tried to fight against it. However, because it was too young and they were afraid that Americans would think they were really spies if they won’t cooperate, JACL decided to follow WRA (36). Furthermore, in “March 27, DeWitt issued Public Proclamation Number 4 which forced persons of Japanese ancestry to stay in military zone 1 after the end of the month, and on March 27, DeWitt issued Exclusion Order Number 1 in which persons of Japanese ancestry were moved from Washington to camp in Manzanar, California” (37). During the war, there were more than 100 evacuation orders and, through this, the innocent Japanese Americans suffered the consequences (37). Despite the abrupt news of internment, the Japanese Americans managed to quickly adapt to the newly provided environment. One of the ways that the Japanese Americans adapted to their new environment was by forming communities at the camps. This is one of the first things that the evacuees did at the camps, and they, with WRA, did so by establishing
Get Access