Life in Nazi Germany

1285 WordsOct 8, 20086 Pages
School children Teachers Teachers who were known to be critical of the Nazi Party were dismissed and the rest were sent away to be trained for a month in National Socialist principles. As a further precaution schools could only use textbooks that have been approved by the party. By 1936 32 per cent of all teachers were members of the National Socialist German Workers Party (NSDAP). This was twice as many as in most other professions. Curriculum Bernard Rust introduced a new curriculum, a Nazi curriculum. Considerable emphasis was made on Physical education/training and history. New courses included racial sciences and origins on the Nazi Party. Religious studies were reduced and ceased to be an exam subject and attendance at prayers…show more content…
For younger boys, aged 10-14, Baldur von Schirach set up the Jungvolk. These youngsters were taught semaphore, arms drill, and take part in two-day cross-country hikes. They also had to learn Nazi dogma and once they passed the necessary tests they were given a special dagger marked "Blood and Honour". The main objective of the organization was to provide Adolf Hitler with loyal supporters. Once girls reached the age of they could join the Jungmädel. At 14 they entered the Bund Deutscher Mädel. (German Girls' League). This included a year of farm or domestic service. They were trained by female guardians and their overall leader was Gertrud Scholtz-Klink. The Hitler Youth published a series of magazines including Youth and Homeland, The Young World, The German Girl and Girls Your World. Another magazine, Will and Power, was produced for HJ leaders and female guardians. At 14 they entered the Bund Deutscher Mädel. (German Girls' League). This included a year of farm or domestic service. They were trained by female guardians and their overall leader was Gertrud Scholtz-Klink. Young girls from the age of ten onward were taken into organizations where they were taught only two things: to take care of their bodies so they could bear as many children as the state needed and to be loyal to National Socialism. Though the Nazis have been forced to recognize, through the lack of men, that

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