Like Lions They Fought: The Zulu War and the Last Black Empire in South Africa by Robert B. Edgerton

1110 WordsFeb 3, 20184 Pages
Working as a professor of anthropology and psychiatry at UCLA, Robert B. Edgerton is the author of Like Lions They Fought: The Zulu War and the Last Black Empire in South Africa and several other historical works about lesser known periods of history, including Death or Glory: The Legacy of the Crimean War and The Fall of the Asante Empire: The Hundred Year War for Africa's Gold Coast. Edgerton's desire in writing this book is clear from the beginning: to make a clear narrative of the Anglo-Zulu War as well as the circumstances that led up to it. Previously, there were very few accounts of the war available to the American audience: the only one was The Washing of the Spears by Donald T. Morris. However, Edgerton claims that Morris's book "contained some errors" and that it was framed "almost entirely through the eyes of the British". Furthermore, more primary sources, such as letters and diary entries had become available to the public, changing historian's interpretation of the war. Edgerton wanted to both remove the "mysticism" surrounding this war and provide an encompassing view of both sides of the conflict using the new resources available to him. The result is a fascinating analysis of this five-month war between the British Empire and the Zulu Kingdom. The book opens up with a graphic exploration of the lead up and the aftermath of the Battle of Isandlwana, the first and most famous battle of the Zulu War because of the loss of the British "redcoats" to the

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