Living with Racism - Still Essay

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Racism in the United States of America
Schools were desegregated in 1968, when I was in the fifth grade. Even though we were now going to the same school, not much else changed where I lived~ at least from my young perspective. I graduated in 1976, and blacks and whites still lived on opposite sides of Highway 77, the road that dissected my town. Affirmative action where I lived meant that a hiring freeze was on, the sentiment being that if the government thought it could tell us who to hire, then we wouldn’t hire anyone. During the day while at school we were friends, but when we went home it was to our side of town. My house was one of the oddities, in that we had our black friends over to dinner and hang out during the day, although we
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Racism in the United States of America
Schools were desegregated in 1968, when I was in the fifth grade. Even though we were now going to the same school, not much else changed where I lived~ at least from my young perspective. I graduated in 1976, and blacks and whites still lived on opposite sides of Highway 77, the road that dissected my town. Affirmative action where I lived meant that a hiring freeze was on, the sentiment being that if the government thought it could tell us who to hire, then we wouldn’t hire anyone. During the day while at school we were friends, but when we went home it was to our side of town. My house was one of the oddities, in that we had our black friends over to dinner and hang out during the day, although we were never asked over to their homes.
When I had children I moved away from my home town, for the sole reason of not wanting them to be raised with the ignorance and hatred that still existed. We lived in seventeen states, wanting them to see that it isn’t that people are right or wrong in their cultural beliefs, but that they are just different.
We witnessed the most prejudices in Hawaii, much to my dismay. When we were making plans to move to Hawaii, I seriously thought it would be the best multi-cultural experience we would experience, but it was the opposite. It was a bit of déjà vu when I would drop off my kids at school because each table or tree held a different group; the Filipinos, the Samoans, the Japanese, the Hawaiians, and the

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