Loneliness in Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck Essay

902 Words 4 Pages
Of Mice and Men is a novella written by John Steinbeck in the 1930’s. It possesses many prominent themes that are evident throughout the whole book. One distinct theme is loneliness. John Steinbeck uses many conventions to convey this theme to the reader including characterization, context, foreshadowing and resolution. Through the use of these conventions, readers developed attitude and opinions, which change with modern society and the reader’s context.

The theme of loneliness is best portrayed through characterisation, and is evident in almost all of the characters in the novel. The gloomiest examples are Crooks and Curley’s wife. Cooks is forced to live in solitude because of his skin colour, and being the only Negro man on the reach
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Of Mice and Men is a novella written by John Steinbeck in the 1930’s. It possesses many prominent themes that are evident throughout the whole book. One distinct theme is loneliness. John Steinbeck uses many conventions to convey this theme to the reader including characterization, context, foreshadowing and resolution. Through the use of these conventions, readers developed attitude and opinions, which change with modern society and the reader’s context.

The theme of loneliness is best portrayed through characterisation, and is evident in almost all of the characters in the novel. The gloomiest examples are Crooks and Curley’s wife. Cooks is forced to live in solitude because of his skin colour, and being the only Negro man on the reach he does not have any company. He is not allowed into the bunkhouse, and the other ranch hands do not want to associate with him, forcing him to spend his time alone. Crooks’ only chance is to connect with the other men during the day while they are working, but because of his deformed back, he is confined to the stable all day, instead of bucking wheat with the other men. He battles his loneliness by consuming himself in books and work, but even he knows they are no substitute for human company. Crooks make this apparent through his dialogue during his conversation with Lennie.
“S’pose you didn’t have nobody. S’pose you couldn’t go into the bunkhouse and play rummy cause you was black. How’d you like that? S’pose you had to sit out here an’
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