Look at Some Data for a Child at the One-Word Stage of Development (This Could Be Video Data for the Childes Database, or Observational/Diary Data You Have Collected from a Child to Whom You Have Access; the Contextual

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Question 7 - Look at some data for a child at the one-word stage of development (this could be video data for the CHILDES database, or observational/diary data you have collected from a child to whom you have access; the contextual function of one-word utterances can be hard to perceive in transcript-only data).

Apply Greenfield and Smith’s analysis, based on the uses of holophrases, to this data. Remember that this analysis is focused on what a child is using their one-word utterances for, i.e. what the holophrases are used to accomplish. Does your data show (some of?) the same functions for holophrases that Greenfield and Smith observed in their study of two children?

1. Introduction
This report will be focusing on child language
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After this, he believed that nouns are used significantly more than any other word class/type. In contrast to this, Greenfield and Smith found that before the age of 1.6 years, children were more likely to use indicative and volitional expressions. From this research, I can look at if there are any of these expression examples within my data.
Children’s initial declarative utterances can be about shared, specific referents and aimed at focusing the listeners attention on something new, that has not been previously mentioned. This is from the egocentric child point of view, (Greenfield and Smith 1976.) The communicative function of the utterance can give a strong idea of the child’s aspect of reality, for example, imperative and interrogative functions. They may not be well differentiated from a referential-type utterance. (Ninio 1992). Early one

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