Lord of the Flies by William Golding

1585 WordsJun 23, 20187 Pages
Lord of the Flies by William Golding is a fictional novel highlighting natural characteristics of man kind. The Book was created during the post World War II period. Before creating this novel, William had experience in the navy where he learned of the nature of mankind. The introduction of the book portrays a plane crash where a large group of boys are stranded on an island. Here they grow in character and human instincts such as leadership, brutality, and survival are displayed. With the influence of the combination of his education and military experience, William Golding wrote one of the most powerful books about the truth or mankind's survival nature. Born on September 19, 1911, in an…show more content…
One way Lord of the Flies can be deciphered is through its message about human nature and society. This novel clearly shows how society easily breaks down into savagery under poor leadership and deficits in true civilization. Two opinions from C.B Cox and Diane Henningfield both agree on the novel's main allegorical connections and their existence. C.B. Cox claims that The Lord of the Flies is presumably the most significant novel to be published in England during the 1950s. Cox also believes that William Golding mastered the craft of writing a twentieth century allegory. She concludes that the main allegory of mankind's barbarism is helped made clear with a gripping plot and the influence of his Christianity. C. B. accredits Golding's vivid imagination to have the Lord of the Flies, or Beelzebub, represent the natural evil in every human being. She believes that Golding's allegorical connections showing the natural mental states of humans during times of survival are highlighted by the gradual change from civilization to savagery in the characters throughout the story. C. B. Cox acknowledges and supports Golding's efforts to use the literary device of allegory. Diane Henningfield is a professor at Adrian College who believes that Lord of the Flies can be read allegorically through multiple ways. These ways include allegorizing a psychological comprehension on humanity, the political status of the world in postwar
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