Losing Isiah

1556 Words Sep 25th, 2013 7 Pages
Early childhood is the most important phase of development in one’s lifespan as the experiences during childhood sets the course for later stages of development. It has been noted that a mother’s actions during pregnancy may influence the development of an infant. The developmental influences include prenatal, perinatal and neonatal environments. (Santrock, 2002) Although babies come into the world with no say or control over which family they will be placed into, or the environment in which they will begin to live in, theorists agree that the first two years are crucial, with early emotional, physical and social development influenced by the infant’s biological and environmental factors (Sigelman, Rider, & De-George Walker, 2013). The …show more content…
Sigelman, (2013) believes that by age 3, children can walk or run in a straight line. Through being raised in a stable home, it can be argued that in Isaiah’s case nurture played a very big role in influencing most of his developmental stages from infancy to toddlerhood. One psychologist, suggests that negative cognitive effects may be ameliorated by a stimulating and sensitive care-giving environment. Cone Wesson also adds that the strong effect of the home environment for ameliorating the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure suggests that a family-focused approach for cognitive, language, and social-emotional habilitation would be beneficial to all (Cone-Wesson 2005). In one instance Isaiah displayed emotional disturbance when cymbals were played at her sister’s concert. Frightened by the sudden noise Isaiah threw a terrible tantrum that caused his mother to leave the concert early. Research has found that, cocaine exposure also may affect emotional–behavioral adjustment and several studies have found that cocaine-exposed infants and toddlers exhibit poorer emotional regulation and impulse control and increased externalizing problems (Bendersky & Lewis, 1998, 2001; Griffith, 1994; Hawley, 1995; Mayes, Bornstein, Chawarska, Haynes, & Granger, 1996; as cited in Bennett, Bendersky & Lewis, (2002). Isaiah still exhibited some developmental problems, but he seemed to have benefited across all developmental domains from being adopted by the Lewins

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