Love in A.S. Byatt's Possession, Zadie Smith's White Teeth, and the Full Monty by Peter Cuttaneo

1676 Words 7 Pages
Love in A.S. Byatt's Possession, Zadie Smith's White Teeth, and the Full Monty by Peter Cuttaneo

As British literature and film seek to sort out the identity crisis that England finds herself in as a post-imperial nation, a variety of views have emerged concerning solutions for Britain’s confusion. One reoccurring theme to these views is love. A.S. Byatt’s Possession, Zadie Smith’s White Teeth, and The Full Monty, directed by Peter Cattaneo, all deal with a traditional, romantic view of true love, whether it is presented as a necessity or a dispensable ideal. While Possession and The Full Monty show romantic love as an essential part of what will push Britain towards rejuvenation, White Teeth presents romance as something that can
…show more content…
Literary theory. Feminism. A sort of social ease, it comes out with Euan, a world you belong in. I haven’t got anything. Or hadn’t. And I grew—attached to you. I know male pride is out of date and unimportant, but it mattered” (Byatt 549). Their love, just like LaMotte and Ash’s, is never about the physical, self-gratification that some relationships are. They learn each other; they grow to appreciate each other. Eventually, Roland, who up to this point lives a boring, emasculated life, not unlike the British living in a Thatcher era, taking his thrills vicariously through Ash as he studies his works, is able to feel something on his own, something passionate, as he tells Maud, “I love you.... In the worst way. All things we—we grew up not believing in. Total obsession, night and day. When I see you, you look alive, and everything else—fades. All that” (Byatt 550). Roland is telling her that the ideal love – that of fairytales that one grows bitter to – is attainable. Through his realization of true love, Roland is able to finally regain his masculinity and consummate their love. Byatt ends this scene, and, thus, the book, describing the next morning. She writes:

In the morning, the whole world had a strange new smell. It was the smell of the aftermath, a green smell, a smell of shredded leaves and oozing resin, of crushed wood and splashed sap, a tart smell, which bore

More about Love in A.S. Byatt's Possession, Zadie Smith's White Teeth, and the Full Monty by Peter Cuttaneo

Open Document