Macbeth

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Macbeth: Character Analysis The Tragedy of Macbeth, by William Shakespeare, is about a soldier, Macbeth, and his friend, Banquo, who meet up with three strange witches who share prophecies with the two men. Macbeth is told that he will become king someday and rule the land of Scotland. The rest of the play follows the actions of once a loyal soldier turned into a greedy king, who seeks to hold the crown forever no matter what the consequences may be. Throughout the play Macbeth displays himself as a dynamic character. At the beginning of the play, he is indecisive about becoming evil and taking over Scotland by committing crimes and murders, or if he should stay loyal to the king and leave things to destiny. As the play progresses,…show more content…
Macbeth invites Banquo to his royal gathering at his palace, but Banquo lets him know that he might not make it because him and his son are going to go ride (38). At the beginning of the play, the three witches prophesized that Banquo’s sons will become kings eventually (11). Since then, Macbeth decides to kill Banquo and his son, Fleance, so that they will no longer be an obstacle to his desire. Macbeth hires two murderers to go and kill Banquo. He tells them that Banquo is the man who held them back from promotion and is their enemy (41). However, these murders do not go as planned. Fleance flees from the scene of where his father was killed by the murderers (47). Now, Macbeth’s mind is starting to become worried. He says, “Then comes my fit again: I had else been perfect, whole as the marble, founded as the rock, as broad and general as the casing air: but now I am cabined, cribbed, confined, bound in to saucy doubts and fears” (48). This quote shows how Macbeth is starting to become worried and fearful of not staying King because Fleance is still alive. It is the banquet scene where we finally see Macbeth completely losing control of his emotions and his true sense of purpose. His sub conscience has clearly dominated his conscious mind and making him do and say things that he would later regret. The fear and guilt of his murder take the form of the ghost of Banquo that he sees sitting at the table.

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