Man Or Monster? By Mary Shelley 's Frankenstein And Oscar Wilde 's The Picture Of Dorian Gray

2820 Words12 Pages
Man or Monster?
According to Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary, a monster is defined as “an animal or plant of abnormal form or structure.” While this definition holds some truth, it is limited to only describing external appearances. In fact, what distinguishes a monster from a seemingly “civilized” man is often not manifested through external appearances. The true monsters are individuals who fail to maturely take responsibility for their actions. In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray, the “monsters” come from creators that will not take responsibilities for their actions and properly care for their creations; therefore, these neglecting creators are the true monsters and not the innocent, impressionable creations. Victor Frankenstein’s characterization and family background establish his nature as the true “monster” in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Victor had an idyllic childhood, which laid the foundation to his self-absorbed and uncaring behavior later in life. As a child, both Victor’s mother and father provided him with excessive care, love, compassion and the freedom to pursue whatever his heart desired. In describing his relationship with his parents, Victor states, “They seemed to draw inexhaustible stores of affection from a very mine of love just to bestow them on me” (Shelley 19). This idea of showering their son with excessive affection is further demonstrated when Alphonse and Caroline adopted Elizabeth Lavenza into their family

More about Man Or Monster? By Mary Shelley 's Frankenstein And Oscar Wilde 's The Picture Of Dorian Gray

Get Access