Management Schools and Theorists:

2016 WordsJul 24, 20109 Pages
Management Schools and Theorists: A Look at W.E. Deming and Peter Drucker Abstract W. E. Deming and Peter F. Drucker are two well-known theorists in the field of management who have their own beliefs on how businesses (organizations) should and could be managed in order to maximize productivity to its fullest potential. Summarized biographies and overviews of each theorists’ beliefs and association with a particular school of management is explained. Sources and references include published literature, articles, and Internet websites. A final look at how each theorist’s view has similarities, yet differ, is detailed in the conclusion. Management Schools and Theorists: A Look at W.E. Deming and Peter Drucker There are…show more content…
8). The aim of supervision should be to help people and machines and gadgets to do a better job. Supervision of management is in need of overhaul, as well as supervision of production workers. 8. Drive out fear, so that everyone may work effectively for the company (see Ch. 3). 9. Break down barriers between departments. People in research, design, sales, and production must work as a team, to foresee problems of production and in use that may be encountered with the product or service. 10. Eliminate slogans, exhortations, and targets for the work force asking for zero defects and new levels of productivity. Such exhortations only create adversarial relationships, as the bulk of the causes of low quality and low productivity belong to the system and thus lie beyond the power of the work force. 11a. Eliminate work standards (quotas) on the factory floor. Substitute leadership. b. Eliminate management by objective. Eliminate management by numbers, numerical goals. Substitute leadership. 12a. Remove barriers that rob the hourly worker of his right to pride of workmanship. The responsibility of supervisors must be changed from sheer numbers to quality. b. Remove barriers that rob people in management and in engineering of their right to pride of workmanship. This means, inter alia, abolishment of the annual or merit rating and of management by objective (see Ch. 3). 13. Institute a vigorous program of education and self-improvement. 14. Put
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