Mandatory overtime

807 WordsMar 4, 20144 Pages
Mandatory Overtime Difference and Dominance Discrimination Discrimination is, in general terms, treating others differently without a justified reason; however, there are two specific types of discrimination as discussed in the book, Feminism: Issues and Arguments, by Jennifer Mather Saul. These two types of discrimination that Saul writes about are Difference and Dominance Discrimination. Difference discrimination is “discrimination where people are treated differently on grounds of sex, unless sex makes a legitimate difference to the decision being made (Saul; pg. 7).” Basically, unless there is a justified reason, treating people differently based on their biological identity is discrimination, or unjust. Dominance…show more content…
In this case, the business policy is not difference discrimination because the business is simply looking for employees who can fulfill the job requirements, not discriminating based on the sexes of the individuals who applied. Under the idea of dominance discrimination, unlike difference discrimination, it is unclear as to whether it truly is dominance discrimination or not. Since the policy requirements are applied to everyone we can’t really distinguish whether or not this is dominance discrimination because it’s not clear as to whether this policy was put into place to deter women from applying or not. However, this overtime policy may be seen as dominance discrimination when we look at the power structure that is currently in society. This power structure is formed around the assumption of the “ideal worker” who is super loyal, available at all times their employer may need them, and “has no life.” The individual who typically is seen as the “ideal worker” is male. This is caused by the power distribution in society because women typically are the primary caregivers and aren’t able to have the time to be able to be the “ideal worker.” This power distribution is causing job
Open Document