Margaret Atwood Spotty Handed Villainesses

1879 Words Mar 31st, 2011 8 Pages
MARGARET ATWOOD: “SPOTTY-HANDED VILLIANESSES: PROBLEMS OF FEMALE BAD BEHAVIOUR IN THE CREATION OF LITERATURE”

BUI

CONTEXT

Margaret Atwood is once of Canada’s best known literary composers. She is best known for her ability as an author of novels such as Alias Grace, Bodily Harm, Hairball, Rape Fantasies, and the highly acclaimed The Handmaid’s Tale, which was later made into a movie. These works establish her as a feminist writer, raising issues of women in literature, the difficulties associated with being female and the role of women in society.

The feminist movement began in the 1960s, as women’s groups searched for equality in the workplace. The movement resulted in the increased participation of women in the paid workforce, and
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We are a happy with an “eternal breakfast” and we “ask for nothing” to happen.

LINKS TO SOCRATES

Both Margaret Atwood and Socrates declare that the upholding of the rights of the individual is imperative to the progress of society. Their reasons for doing so, however, were different. Socrates advocates the rights of the individual in the defence and justification of his actions, whereas Atwood suggests that women should have the right to choose whether they wish to be seen as good or bad, and that it is wrong to deny women the right to have evil in them.

JENNIFER

TECHNIQUES

- Atwood opens her speech using colloquial language. The informal nature of her language makes her speech more accessible for the audience and the humour associated with the colloquial phrases engaging. It sets the casual atmosphere in which the speech is delivered.

- In the opening, she shares her childhood encounters with women in prose with the children’s rhyme “a little girl who had a curl”. This personal anecdote introduces the topic of the portrayal of women in literature, as well as establishes a connection with her audience.

- “It brought home to me the deeply Jungian possibilities of a Dr Jekyll-Mr Hyde double life for women.” Atwood makes a psychoanalytical allusion to Robert Louis Stevenson’s famous novel, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, which tells of a
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