Marie Sklodowska was born Warsaw, Poland in 1867. She was raised by two teachers who supported the

1300 WordsApr 23, 20196 Pages
Marie Sklodowska was born Warsaw, Poland in 1867. She was raised by two teachers who supported the idea of a good education. She was a great student and was always willing to learn but the education she desired was not available in Poland so when her sister, Bronya, went to Paris, Marie followed. Marie went to school in Paris to get a teaching diploma in mathematics and physics and then to return to Poland. She didn’t live with her sister and new brother-in-law because she liked the freedom she had in an apartment of her own. After 3 years of living in Paris, she received a diploma in physics and mathematics. Pierre Curie was an internationally known physicist but not well known in the French scientific community. His only dream was to…show more content…
Her results were immediate. She noticed that the element thorium gave off the same rays as uranium. After a lot of research she came to the conclusion that radiation did not depend on the compound being studied. She said that it depended on the amount of uranium or thorium. She concluded that radiation did not depend on the arrangement of atoms in a compound in a molecule but rather the interior of the atom itself. The discovery was considered to be revolutionary at the time. She continued to test all elements on the Periodic Table of Elements. Only uranium and thorium gave off any sort of radiation. Her next experiment was quite simple. She wanted to test natural ores that contain uranium or thorium. She gathered samples from geological museums and found that pitchblende was four to five times active with small amounts of uranium. Pitchblende is a form of the mineral uraninite occurring in brown or black pitch like masses. Her brand new hypothesis was that a new element that was considerably more active than uranium was preset in small amounts of ore. Pierre gave up his research of crystals which he was heavily dedicated to join Marie in her scientific studies. They both found that strong reactions came from test samples containing bismuth or barium. Following up on bismuth, Marie discovered that every time she took away an amount of bismuth, a residue with greater activity was left behind. By 1898, the substance was 300 times the strength of

    More about Marie Sklodowska was born Warsaw, Poland in 1867. She was raised by two teachers who supported the

      Open Document