Mary Shelley's Frankenstein Essay

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Mary Shelley's Frankenstein The creature of the novel Frankenstein is intelligent, naïve, powerful and frightening. He seeks vengeance, kills three people, and haunts his creator to the end of his (Frankenstein’s) days. Why? What inspired and what enraged the creature so much so that he felt this was the only path to pursue? When we first meet the creature (truly meet him, that is), he shows his intelligence through speech. One must certainly expect him to be a drooling, dumb and violent creature, but he is, in fact, quite the opposite. He is violent, yes, but he does not show his violent physical side unless provoked to anger. More often than not the creature is full of self pity, cursing his existence and his creator for…show more content…
Another circumstance strengthened and confirmed these feelings. Soon after my arrival in the hovel, I discovered some papers in the pocket of the dress which I had taken from your laboratory… It was your journal of the four months that preceded my creation. (117) From this statement by the creature it can be seen that the papers he discovers and the book Paradise Lost are linked to each other, in a way. The key line that proves this is, of course, “another circumstance strengthened and confirmed these feelings.” After discovering and reading the papers, it was strengthened and confirmed in his mind that he is, indeed, far more like Lucifer than he is like Adam. This strange link in his mind to Satan (and, to a lesser degree he still links himself to Adam as well) could very well be another reason why he told Frankenstein to make another creature (a female creature) for him to pass his days with. The line to be considered as proof of this thought is found on page 117, where the creature states, “Satan had his companions, fellow-devils, to admire and encourage him; but I am solitary and abhorred.” After this, the creature describes the melancholy, sadness and bitterness he felt toward his own situation and to his creator (a very much repeated theme throughout the novel) as he passed his time watching the family that lived nearby. However, soon

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