Mass Surveillance Analysis

990 Words4 Pages
When Edward Snowden leaked a large cache of classified NSA documents to the press in 2012 he fanned the flames of an already suspicious public by revealing an astonishing amount of information about the United States government’s mass surveillance operations in our country, and around the globe. These revelations weren’t quite as surprising to many experts in the field of cryptography and internet security, especially in the post 9/11 era, as the unprecedented amount of power granted to the federal government in the wake of those attacks, in the form of the Patriot Act, has given rise to warrantless wiretapping and blanket surveillance tactics that are used in the fight against domestic terrorism. However, government surveillance dates back…show more content…
In the Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, our forefathers established that all people should “be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized” (amend. IV). The salient point in this amendment as it relates to mass surveillance is the concept of “probable cause”, as mass surveillance violates the security of people’s personal effects in the form of collecting network transmissions of emails, online bank account information, social network content, and basically everything else that is connected to the internet at large. Having worked in information technology for over a decade, it has become very clear to me that keeping data truly private on the internet is next to impossible considering the various backdoors and security vulnerabilities that government powers have discovered and taken advantage of as more and more people rely on the internet for…show more content…
These findings aim to better inform the reader of what constitutes true privacy in a surveillance, and raise concerns about violations to our constitutional right to privacy and security in the digital age. This work will also aim to identify the common methods that are used by Internet Service Providers to protect their customers’ personal information, and the lengths at which law enforcement and government intelligence agencies will go through to compromise that protection and
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