Mcdonald's Market Structure

5301 Words Apr 3rd, 2013 22 Pages
Introduction By the late- 1990s fast-food chain McDonalds had enjoyed 40 years of exceptional performance. McDonald's brand mission is to be a customers' favorite place and way to eat. McDonald's worldwide operations are aligned around a global strategy called the Plan to Win, which center on an exceptional customer experience – People, Products, Place, Price and Promotion. They are committed to continuously improving theirs operations and enhancing customers' experience. McDonalds place the customer experience at the core of all they do. McDonald’s customers are the reason for their existence. So, McDonalds’s demonstrate appreciation by providing them with high quality food and superior service in a clean, welcoming environment, at a …show more content…
A period of aggressive advertising campaigns and price slashing in the early 1980s became known as the "burger wars." Burger King suggested to customers: "have it your way" and had attracted many customer and affected McDonald's sales and market share.
The predecessor to what is now the international fast food restaurant chain Burger King was founded in 1953 in Jacksonville, Florida, as Insta-Burger King. Inspired by the McDonald brothers' original store location in San Bernardino, California, the founders and owners, Keith J. Kramer and his wife's uncle Matthew Burns, began searching for a concept to open a new restaurant around. After purchasing the rights to two pieces of equipment called "Insta" machines, the two opened their first stores around a cooking device known as the Insta-Broiler. The Insta-Broiler oven proved so successful at cooking burgers, they required all of their franchises to carry the device. After the original company began to falter in 1959, it was purchased by its Miami, Florida, franchisees James McLamore and David R. Edgerton. The two initiated a corporate restructuring of the chain; the first step was to rename the company Burger King. The duo ran the company as an independent entity for eight years, eventually expanding to over 250 locations in the United States, when they sold it to the Pillsbury Company
Open Document