Mean Girls, directed by Mark Waters

1221 WordsJul 15, 20185 Pages
Today is a day unlike any you have experienced. You get yourself ready and arrive in a territory you could never be fully prepared for. In this new arena, you gaze out upon a vast variety of specimen. Each species holds closely to their kind to such an extent that it is as if the food chain is sprawled out in front of you in perfect balance. As your gaze ascends, it is abrasively obvious who hold the top of this bionetwork. The dominant, carnivorous female stands proudly and walks through the others with her team of hunters following closely behind. All other members of the ecology you have been submerged in part as they walk through, half watch in awe and all hope this leader is not hungry. Today is not your first day in the…show more content…
Teenagers tend to act with abrasive and juvenile behavior, which makes most adults and educators generally ignore behavior issues, so as not to have to deal with them, which only fuels the social jungle of high school. The principal and teachers of the high school in Mean Girls seemed to be turned off to the social realm of their school until a physical fight broke out forcing them to intervene. The knowledge of “girl world” rules seemed to benefit “Cady” the most and be both directly and indirectly encouraged by those around her. Knowing that she could only have her hair in a ponytail once a week, could not repeat a tank top two days in a row, that jeans and track pants were only allowed on Friday, and, most importantly, how to properly manipulate everyone around her rose “Cady” to royalty status making everything else obsolete. When only the “nerds” and “art freaks” would accept her with academic success, the entire school would admire her for social success. Social dominance truly seems greater than achieving scholastic achievements in American high schools. Why be the smart gazelle when you can be the strong lioness? Even the best gazelle, on its’ worst day, is lion food. The typical stereotypes viewed in the American high school ecosystem are labeled and ranked, from the best to the worst, in the movie Mean Girls in order to relate directly to the movie’s audience of teenaged females. On “Cady’s” first day of school, “Janis” explains to her that where

More about Mean Girls, directed by Mark Waters

Open Document