Media And World Events Changed Course?

1205 WordsOct 20, 20165 Pages
Throughout the last century, the way in which we receive information about the world around us has changed drastically. We no longer wait two or three weeks for letters in the mail or sit around the radio for the nightly news cap. In 2015, more than 68% of Americans owned a smart phone, while 73% owned a laptop or desktop computer (Anderson, 1). Due to the development of technology, we gather information quicker and more efficiently than we did even a decade ago but has the relationship between media and world events changed course? According to Richard Oliver Collin and Pamela L. Martin, the authors of An Introduction to World Politics, the new developments in technology surrounding the way in which we access the media has changed how we responded to world events, ultimately affecting how events play out. With the uprising of smartphones, news is constantly available at the tap of a button, virtually anywhere. News sources such as CNN, NBC, and BBC, have all developed apps in which allow users to customize the type of news they see and what news articles warrant alerts and notifications (Martin and Collin, 31). People no longer need to go to internet cafés or log on to their own personal computers; breaking stories from around the globe are available almost as soon as they happen and now subscribers have the luxury to view these stories no matter their location. The idea that world events are published rather quickly came from the start of journalism at the turn of the
Open Document