Essay on Media Influence on Black Children

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Media Influence on Black/African-American Children

Abstract: An overview of how media in the decades since the 1950s had influenced the education of Black/African-Americann Students.

Media in the decades since the 1950s has dramatically influenced the education of Black/African-American children. The media, which includes television, newspapers, magazines, radio, advertising and the internet, is a vital part of constantly creating and reinforcing stereotypes. Media affects and influences the nation and the world through many different ways. Mass media is a name given to organizations that communicate to our society. Mass media also shows us what kind of society we live within. Television is the biggest type of media simply because
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Blacks faced social, economical, physical and political disadvantages. Even cartoons in the 50’s continued to show blacks characters that were depicted as very dark brown, wooly black hair, large red lips, so large there were disproportionate with the rest of the face, the animated Colored character appeared dim witted and usually took the brunt of the joke. The image of African-Americans has been greatly depreciated by the roles they play on television sitcoms. On these shows African-Americans are depicted as being maids, clowns, and buffoons. This misrepresentation of African-Americans has become common place through out the media. Black people faced many injustices in America. One of the most controversial sitcoms was the Amos ‘n Andy Show. This sitcom included two black comedic men, this show is the start of the creation of the African-American stereotypes that most people have grown accustom to today. Initially, the Amos ‘n Andy Show began as a radio show with two white men portraying two black men. When the show transferred to television, it consisted of two black men portraying the two black comedic dummies. They were still performing the slapstick comedy as made popular on the radio show, but to be able to see them visually had a greater effect. The roles that the two black men played are the typical roles that blacks play in
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