Mexicans in the United States Essay

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In attempting to discuss the history of Chicanos, or Mexican-Americans and their experiences in the United States, an economic analysis may provide the best interpretation for their failure to achieve the status of first class citizens. This difficulty in achieving equality of citizenship is deeply rooted in both the economic self-interest of the Anglo-Americans, as well as their inherent perception of Otherness in Chicanos. This paper will explain the importance of this history and its context in the American framework. Beginning with the Chicano experience of the precolonial period and continuing through the Mexican-American war, analyzing particularly the Mercantilist policy which guided the colonization, alongside the …show more content…
However in class discussion and our repeated ignorance of the condition Chicanos experienced through our nations history it is clear that there is much to be learned about this group. In an attempt to organize their history from an economic standpoint, it can be dually noted that through our country's rush to modernize we often sacrifice sound development programs in the regions often occupied by Chicanos. This lack of development programming, comes at the expense of our minority groups. Through their history in this nation, "Powerful interests have succeeded in keeping the Mexican the most underpaid and most oppressed worker so that they [the Americans] will always have a surplus of cheap labor" (Vargas 341)

A concurrent theme throughout this section of this piece will be Manifest Destiny. The term implies the mentality assumed by conquerors to justify the complete subjugation and absorption of new lands and their inhabitants, using Divine Providence and Faith as their reasoning. The economic policy at the time colonization of the New World was occurring was that of Mercantilism. This policy aimed to enhance the power of the center nation through the accumulation of large quantities of gold bullion to stimulate its economy. These European powers then saw the New World as a valuable opportunity to