Michael Sandel's The Case Against Perfection

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The Case Against Perfection written by Michael J. Sandel explores the emerging probabilities in the realm of genetic engineering and societal consequences if designer babies and genetic enhancement programs are pursued. While Sandel may have a definite stance regarding genetic engineering, he explores every side of the issue to justify his perspective. He envisions a future where science will pursuit human perfection in attempts to eliminate the supposedly “imperfect” people, such as those with down syndrome (a path we’re already on) and hereditary deafness. Consequently, this may lead to a world much more competitive and less forgiving than it already is. Not only will those with “imperfections” will be discriminated against, even more troubling,…show more content…
Because consider all the birth defects that could bring about. Of course it is unreasonable to ban sex, however, any children conceived in this fashion are almost certain to be “in-valids” - genetically imperfect and unsuitable to be productive members of society. Therefore, there is now a better method that ensures health, stamina, and many more perfect traits. Allow science to take charge. Everyone does it. Or at least everyone who wants to give their child the best possible start. This is the alarming yet feasible premise of Gattaca, a world Sandel forewarns. Gattaca is a 1997 film by Andrew Niccol based on a society where genetic modification of children is the standard. Children are promised with the best possible traits, thus the best possible future. It is a society of members at the top of the gene pool. Unless, you are a “faith child,” made out of love, conceived naturally, and not engineered for perfection. Conceived by love, Vincent Freeman is considered an anomaly. In this era of genetic engineering, he is perceived as an “in-valid,” a term used to describe those imperfect humans that failed to be genetically modified. Indeed, Vincent’s genetic profile has several defects: a weak heart, bad eyesight, emotional problems, and a lifespan of only 30 years. In a world where your genetic profile is the only resume you need,…show more content…
Or a pterodactyl soaring overhead. Sounds far fetched? Yet, genetic engineering makes it possible to "resurrect" extinct species, as shown in Jurassic Park. And what would this park of extinct species be without dinosaurs to fill it? Based on a Michael Crichton novel, Spielberg’s film relied on the idea that dinosaurs could be recovered by collecting ancient amber-trapped mosquitoes that had supped on dinosaur blood. And as we all know, all goes to hell when a corporate rival attempts to steal dinosaur embryos while releasing the captured dinosaurs. It comes to no surprise that while genetic engineering can be beneficial, reckless use led to horrors in Jurassic Park, including genetically engineered dinosaurs on a rampage. God creates dinosaurs, god kills dinosaurs, god creates man, man kills god, man brings back dinosaurs, dinosaurs will kill man. While the scientists were too preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn’t stop and think if they should (Jurassic Park). However, Jurassic Park isn’t just about dinosaurs. It’s about the park, too. While one of the message of the story is man attempting to conquer nature, it is also a horror story of capitalism using science for profit. More than twenty years later, scientists unwittingly released dinosaurs to run amok still remains in the public’s imagination. Spielberg presents a cautionary tale of corporate, capitalistic greed gone wrong due to their attempt to
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