Middle Phase Practice in Social Work

1988 Words Jul 8th, 2015 8 Pages
Transitions—Middle Phase Practice

Simone G. Benson
Fordham University
Spring 2015

The agency where I am interning is Partnership with Children. “Partnership” as it is called, works to strengthen the emotional, social and academic skills of at-risk children to prepare them for success--academically, socially, and in life. “Partnership’s” programs aim to bridge the gap between those who have a vested interest in working within New York City’s highest-need public schools, and those in need. “Partnership’s” goal is to transform the overall culture of many of the city’s struggling schools by helping students cope with the extreme stress of living in poverty. Helping students thrive in safe and supportive schools that encourage
…show more content…
My role at the school is to provide one-on-one counseling for identified, at risk youth, as well as to co-facilitate groups--both full classroom and afterschool. I currently have five students in my individual caseload; I co-facilitate one after-school group for 3rd grade boys, and a 1st and 2nd grade boys’ group one day per week during lunch.
My client, whom I will call “Jay,” is an eight-year-old, African-American boy, who was referred to our agency by his mother who wanted him to get “any services he could get for free.” He has some emotional and behavioral deficiencies, and does not handle stress well. He has frequent outbursts in class, and reacts without thinking. He needs to work on his interaction skills, and develop strategies that will help him use his words instead of physical reactions when he is frustrated. Because his trigger is frustration, he needs to learn to respond in a positive manner to his peers and teachers. Also, “Jay” needs to learn how to think and act independently. According to the National Association of Social Workers website, “Social work practice consists of the professional application of social work values, principles, and techniques to one or more of the following ends: helping people obtain tangible services; counseling and psychotherapy with individuals, families, and groups; helping communities or groups provide or