Mississippi Mavens Stand Against Racism, Injustice, and Segregation

644 Words 3 Pages
Mississippi history is full of strong African American women who made a stand against racism, injustice, and segregation, or paved the way for others to achieve the American Dream. Ida B. Wells, Ruby Bridges, and Oprah Winfrey each fought for equality of African-Americans in different ways and different time periods, but each has made a major impact on Mississippi and elsewhere in the United States. Ida B. Wells was born in Holy Springs, Mississippi on July 16, 1862. Ida was born into slavery. Ida’s father served on the board of trustees for Rust College so he made education a priority for his 7 children. Ida received early schooling but she had to drop out at the age of 16, when tragedy struck her family. Both her parents and one …show more content…
Mississippi history is full of strong African American women who made a stand against racism, injustice, and segregation, or paved the way for others to achieve the American Dream. Ida B. Wells, Ruby Bridges, and Oprah Winfrey each fought for equality of African-Americans in different ways and different time periods, but each has made a major impact on Mississippi and elsewhere in the United States. Ida B. Wells was born in Holy Springs, Mississippi on July 16, 1862. Ida was born into slavery. Ida’s father served on the board of trustees for Rust College so he made education a priority for his 7 children. Ida received early schooling but she had to drop out at the age of 16, when tragedy struck her family. Both her parents and one sibling died in a yellow fever outbreak, so Ida was left to care for her younger siblings. Ida was a very strong African American woman she formed the National Association of colored women in 1896. Ida B. Wells should be remembered as an African-American woman who battled both racism and sexism at a time when it was extremely dangerous to speak out. She used her gift of writing, speaking and organizing to help shed light on injustice. She was extremely brave and held steadfast to her convictions despite being criticized, ostracized and marginalized by her contemporaries. Ida was a fighter she fought against prejudice, no matter what potential dangers she faced. Ida had gotten married to Ferdinand Barnett in 1898 and she was known as Ida B.
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