Modern Politics And International Relations

1805 WordsNov 17, 20158 Pages
Events throughout history have brought about changes in every aspect of life, especially in the realm of politics and international relations. In this regard, scholarly articles, recent events, and in class discussions have suggested that certain theories can no longer be applied to the study of international relations due to changes in the state system structure during the past half-century. One such example is the shift in thinking involving the realist balance of power theory. While some could argue that modified forms of balance of power theory can still be applied, I am a proponent of the opposite opinion. I believe the global interdependence that has formed over this half century is the main means by which balance of power theory has been rendered obsolete and therefore, is not useful in any region of the world for explaining state system structures. The qualities of interdependence such as the partial surrendering of sovereignty to international organizations and merging of economies can no longer permit the sort of state behavior used in balance of power theory. Three separate situations between the United States and Canada, the United States and China, and between key members of the Eurozone serve as examples of this idea that this realist theory is no longer applicable. While these examples are largely economic, other examples I will not discuss are physical and military as well. Before examining each example, it is necessary to define balance of power theory. The
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