Monty Python Influences

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From comedy to literature and even having their own word in the dictionary, Monty Python has influenced the culture of Britain heavily. The sextet’s surreal humor has manipulated what many people find to be funny. The use of their word has affected British literature. Their popular song “Always Look On The Bright Side Of Life” has become the most played song in funerals throughout Britain.

My primary sources include The Atlantic, and CNN. My secondary sources are The Rolling Stone and Biography.com. My other sources are “Monty Python, Shakespeare and English Renaissance Drama” and “Jesus and Brian: Exploring the Historical Jesus and his Times via Monty Python’s Life of Brian”. I used these sources because they seemed reliable. The
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He joined the Footlights Dramatic Club with John Cleese and Graham Chapman in 1962. He earned his English Literature degree in 1965. After graduation, he began writing for The Frost Report where he met 4 other future members of the surreal comedy group Monty Python. Terry Jones was born February 1, 1942 in Colwyn Bay, United Kingdom. He went to the Royal Grammar School in Guilford, as well as Saint Edmund Hall in Oxford. During his time at Saint Edmund Hall, he performed comedy with Michael Palin in the Oxford Revue. Terry Gilliam came about November 22, 1940 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He would build things with his father who was a carpenter and would never watch television. He attended Birmingham High School in Lake Balboa, California. He went on to graduate and get a political science degree at Occidental College. Jones moved to England in 1967, and got a job as an animator at a children’s show named Do Not Adjust Your Set. After that, he moved to Monty Python’s Flying Circus, eventually becoming a part of the group.

Michael Palin was born May 5, 1943. His hometown is in Broomhill, Sheffield, England. At Oxford’s Brasenose College he met Terry Jones and developed his talent with the Oxford Revue comedy group, as well as graduating with a modern history degree in 1965. In 1966, himself and Terry Jones were hired to write for The Frost Report. He created Do Not Adjust Your Set with Terry Jones and Eric Idle. Graham Chapman was

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